Research & Statistics

The Truth About Negative Reviews

Consumers require negative reviews to believe positive reviews (The Positive Effect of Negative Information, Stanford Graduate School of Business, June 2011)

How Reviews Persuade and Ratings Convert

A study of more than 386,000 anonymous physician ratings posted on the RateMDs.com Website between 2005 and 2010 found that, on average, physicians received a quality rating of 3.93 out of 5 (Ratings Doctors Is Tricky, but Consumer Reports Does it in Massachusetts, Kaiser Health News)

70% take action after reading consumer opinions posted online (Nielsen, Global Trust in Advertising and Brand Messages, Sept. 2013)

70% of Americans say they look at reviews before taking the next step to conversion (Zero Moment of Truth, Google, January 2013)

Patient Satisfaction Surveys

“Stated plainly, the simple act of conducting feedback surveys can increase customer engagement and drive retention…the very process of asking for feedback can induce a customer to form a positive opinion on something that they would otherwise not have considered.” (How Surveys Influence Customers, Harvard Business Review, May 2002)

Transparency and Trust

Yelp deems 20% of user reviews “suspicious” (MarketWatch, Sept. 2013)

68% of consumers trust consumer opinions posted online (Nielsen, Global Trust in Advertising and Brand Messages, Sept. 2013)

Importance of reviews for doctors

96% of aesthetic consumers believe reviews are important when choosing their surgeon (RealSelf, Aesthetic Consumers Like Reviews, Board-certified Doctors and Enough Time to Decide, Nov. 2012)

After restaurants, consumers read reviews of doctors and dentists more than any other category (BrightLocal, Local Consumer Review Survey, June 2013)